Category Archives: Silenced people

Silenced people, Dr. Karla Turner (murdered)

Too dangerous information lead to one more death… Here is the story of Karla Turner:

Welcome to KarlaTurner.org

An online memorial and tribute to a brave researcher of covert “alien” abductions and mind control. Dr. Turner paid the ultimate price for trying to defend herself and her family, and to alert other innocent citizens to the danger that we all now face.

About Dr. Karla Turner …

Dr. Karla Turner died of cancer on January 10, 1996, after being threatened for her work. She was just 48. Since then, several other people involved in UFO investigation have also experienced threats followed by highly unusual cancers. Several of her case studies are now dead.

Karla was widely respected in the UFO community for her research on alien abduction. A scholar and professional educator, she earned a Ph.D. in Old English studies and taught at the university level in Texas for more than ten years. But in 1988, she and her husband and son endured a shocking series of experiences and recollections that forced them to recognize that they were all abductees.

Karla’s response was to drop her professional university career and turn her full attention to abduction research. Her first book, Into the Fringe (Berkley Books, 1992), told of her own experiences and those of her family. Her second book, Taken – Inside the Alien-Human Abduction Agenda (Kelt Works, 1994), profiled the abduction stories of eight women whose experiences included both “alien” and human intrusions, and both benign and negative elements, illustrating the profoundly complex nature of the abduction mystery. Her most recent book, Masquerade of Angels (Kelt Works, 1994), was co-written with psychic Ted Rice and recounts Ted’s lifelong encounters with strange entities whose identity hovered in a shadowland between angelic and demonic. Karla was working on another book when she became ill in early 1995. 

(Excerpted from ISCNI*Flash 1.21 – January 16, 1996)

… and the Bartholic Killings

Dr. Turner’s research associate Barbara Bartholic and Barbara’s husband Bob were involved in a high-speed automobile collision in 2010.   The news reported that the other vehicle was being driven by a carjacker who had just stolen it not long before, but somehow managed to flee the scene and disappear despite a reported impact speed of over 100 MPH.  Bob died from his injuries shortly thereafter, and Barbara spent several weeks in the hospital.

Following her discharge, Barbara told me on the phone that she was certain that the accident had been deliberately engineered in order to punish her for having allowed me to visit her and Bob at their home in Tulsa, Oklahoma for three days in 2009 and view her private research materials.  She also stated that when she was in the hospital, several acquaintances of hers visited her, speaking sympathetic phrases such as “how ARE you?” in a mocking tone.

In October 2010, the creator of the present website was subjected to a premeditated severe physical assault followed by a series of events that were designed to instill in him a sense of mortal fear, and to provoke him if possible into a reaction that might be ruinous to his life and future.  Barbara Bartholic died (reportedly by stroke) at the same time that this situation was unfolding.   The threat of malicious arbitrary psychiatric diagnosis is in effect to prevent further disclosure of details from being made or any remedies (medical, legal or otherwise) from being obtained.1

Subsequent events have demonstrated beyond any doubt that all of this has nothing whatsoever to do with “aliens” but rather to continuing government mind-control operations (the term “operations” being specifically chosen as opposed to “experiments” — there is nothing at all “experimental” about what is being done).   The reports of the abductees contained in Dr. Turner’s work therefore remain extremely important in the context of shedding light on the nature of the crimes which have been perpetrated against innocent civilians during the last several decades.

I suggest that “alien abductees” are in reality merely one sub-group of a larger population of targeted individuals.  Their experiences constitute the little-known symptoms of a covert long-term military campaign whose goal, global in scope, is to redefine the nature of government on Earth and to utilize extremely advanced technologies to control the human population in ways not even considered possible by the general public.   For more information about these subjects, I invite you to explore the rest of this website, beginning with Special Exhibits: Mind Control.

Jeff Polachek
2012

Source

Here is the Karla Turner testimony (12 Parts):

 

Here are Karla Turner’s books. You can find these on the left side under “Downloads”:

>> Masquerade Of Angels by Karla Turner

>> Into The Fringe by Karla Turner

>> Taken: Inside The Alien-Human Agenda by Karla Turner

Study this and spread the info so that Karla didn’t die in vain.

Rene Caisse and Essiac – Herbal tea promoted as an alternative treatment for cancer and other illnesses

Here’s something to think about. Alternative, silenced treatment for canser and other illnesses. When U.S. Food and Drug Administration,  the National Cancer Institute,and the American Cancer Society say this treatment doesn’t work and should be suppressed, then it must be the Truth. I think when those kind of big organizations get scared, then there is something that threats their money. So here we have a nurse who cured many canser patients until she was forced to stop. What? Yes she was forced to stop curing people from canser. It’s a insane World we are living…

First something about Rene Caisse:

Rene Caisse

Many believe Rene Caisse (pronounced “reen case”) is one of the greater heroines of the past century.

This modest Canadian nurse discovered a natural herbal formula she took no money for it and died in relative obscurity.

Rene didn’t feel herself a writer so she never wrote an autobiography. She did, however, write a series of articles entitled “I Was Canada’s Cancer Nurse” which was published in the seventies with Bracebridge Examiner. Additionally, a collection of her writing and interviews was published posthumously in the Bracebridge Examiner.

She wrote a brief biography of her family and their settlement in Bracebridge, which you can read in her own words (click here).

A Great Discovery

In the 1920s Rene encountered a prospector’s wife who survived breast cancer. She tells it her own words (click here).

It Looked Encouraging

The initial use of Essiac was encouraging, so much so that a group of doctors assisted her in setting up a test lab and clinic in Toronto. She tells it her own words (click here).

The Bracebridge Clinic

She was invited by the Bracebridge Town Council to open her clinic in the old British Lion Hotel. Her lease payment, as stipulated by the Council, was $1 per month. It was here she ran her clinic from 1934 to 1942. She tells it her own words (click here).

Challenging the Establishment

Even before she opened the clinic, the medical establishment viewed her with skepticism. With the clinic now open, the full weight of the establishment unrelentingly bore down on her for years to come. She tells it her own words (click here).

A Requiem for Rene

Rene Caisse passed from this world on the day after Christmas, 1978, at 90 years of age. This obituary was published for her in the Bracebridge Examiner, click here to view.

Source

Here is the story about Essiac:

Essiac

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Essiac, marketed as Flor Essence and several other brands, is an herbal tea promoted as an alternative treatment for cancer and other illnesses.[1] As with many alternative remedies, the exact composition of essiac is unclear, but it reportedly contains burdock, Indian rhubarb, sheep sorrel, and slippery elm bark. Some formulations may also contain watercress, blessed thistle, red clover, and kelp.[2] From the 1920s through the 1970s, essiac was promoted as a cancer treatment by Rene Caisse, a Canadian nurse, who claimed that it had been given to her by a patient and that the recipe derived from an Ontario Ojibwamedicine man.[2] The name “Essiac” is Caisse’s surname spelled backwards.

In 1977, Caisse gave the essiac formula to a Canadian company, which attempted to commercialize the product. However, the company was unable to show any efficacy of essiac against cancer. Repeated laboratory tests showed that essiac failed to slow tumor growth and, in large doses, killed test animals. In a number of studies, essiac actually increased the rate of cancer growth.[3] As a result both the U.S. and Canadian governments refused to approve essiac as a medical treatment. Essiac was instead marketed as a dietary supplement, subject to much looser regulation and not required to show any proof of effectiveness.[2]

Essiac’s purported effect on cancer has been reviewed by several major medical and scientific bodies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration,[4] the National Cancer Institute,[2] and the American Cancer Society.[5] All have found no evidence that essiac has any effect against cancer. The U.S. FDA described essiac as a “Fake Cancer ‘Cure’ Consumers Should Avoid”.[4] Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have written that Essiac continues to be a popular cancer therapy despite unsubstantiated claims of its effectiveness.[6]

Source

And here is the documentary about Rene Caisse and the Essiac (4 parts):

 

Then we have a documentary about other suppressed canser treatments here:

 

 

So I think that Big Pharma just want to keep us sick and ill, because it is a damn good business!!!

If you shut up truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow, and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it bursts through it will blow up everything in its way.
EMILE ZOLA

Dr. Royal Raymond Rife’s suppressed canser cure

How many promising cures has Big Pharma destroyed? Too many if you ask me and here is one of them:

Royal Raymond Rife (May 16, 1888 – August 5, 1971) was an American inventor and early exponent of high-magnification time-lapse cine-micrography.[1][2] In the 1930s, he claimed that by using a specially designed optical microscope, he could observe a number of microbes which were too small to visualize with previously existing technology.[3] Rife also reported that a ‘beam ray’ device of his invention could weaken or destroy the pathogens by energetically exciting destructive resonances in their constituent chemicals.[4]

Rife’s claims could not be independently replicated, [5] and were ultimately discredited by the medical profession in the 1950s. Rife blamed the scientific rejection of his claims on a conspiracy involving the American Medical Association (AMA), the Department of Public Health, and other elements of “organized medicine”, which had “brainwashed” potential supporters of his devices.[6]

Interest in Rife’s claims was revived in some alternative medical circles by the 1987 book “The Cancer Cure That Worked”, which claimed that Rife had succeeded in curing cancer, but that his work was suppressed by a powerful conspiracy headed by the AMA.[7][5] After this book’s publication, a variety of devices bearing Rife’s name were marketed as cures for diverse diseases such as cancer and AIDS. An analysis by Electronics Australia found that a typical ‘Rife device’ consisted of a nine-volt battery, wiring, a switch, a timer and two short lengths of copper tubing, which delivered an “almost undetectable” current unlikely to penetrate the skin.[8] Several marketers of other ‘Rife devices’ have been convicted for health fraud, and in some cases cancer patients who used these devices as a replacement for medical therapy have died.[9] Rife devices are currently classified as a subset of radionics devices, which are generally viewed as pseudomedicine by mainstream experts.[5]

Life and work

Little reliable published information exists describing Rife’s life. In 1929, he was granted a patent for a high-intensity microscope lamp.[10] On November 20, 1931, forty-four doctors attended a dinner advertised as “The End To All Diseases” at the Pasadena estate of Milbank Johnson, honoring Arthur I. Kendall of Northwestern Medical School and Rife, the developer of the ‘Rife microscope’.[citation needed] Moving microorganisms from prepared, diseased human tissue were reportedly seen, still-photographed and also filmed with motion-picture equipment.[11]

In a 1932 report in Science, Mayo Clinic physician Edward C. Rosenow wrote that in addition to other small particles viewable with the standard lab microscope, small turquoise bodies termed ‘eberthella typhi’ not visible with the standard lab microscopes were seen in filtrate using a Rife microscope. Rosenow attributed their detection to “the ingenious methods employed rather than excessively high magnification”.[12] Subsequently, one of Rife’s microscopes was mentioned in the 1944 Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution.[13]

Rife claimed to have documented a “Mortal Oscillatory Rate” for various pathogenic organisms, and to be able to destroy the organisms by vibrating them at this particular rate. According to the San Diego Evening Tribune in 1938, Rife stopped short of claiming that he could cure cancer, but did argue that he could “devitalize disease organisms” in living tissue, “with certain exceptions”.[4]

Rife’s work and claims were ultimately discredited by the medical community, a result which Rife blamed on powerful conspiracies against him. An obituary in the Daily Californian described his death at the age of 83 on August 5, 1971, stating that he died penniless and embittered by the failure of his devices to garner scientific acceptance.[6]

Modern revival, marketing, and health fraud

Interest in Rife was revived in the 1980s by author Barry Lynes, who wrote a book about Rife entitled “The Cancer Cure That Worked“. The book claimed that Rife’s ‘beam ray’ device could cure cancer, but that all mention of his discoveries was suppressed in the 1930s by a wide-ranging conspiracy headed by the American Medical Association. The American Cancer Society described Lynes’ claims as implausible, noting that the book was written “in a style typical of conspiratorial theorists” and defied any independent verification.[5]

In response to this renewed interest, devices bearing Rife’s name began to be produced and marketed in the 1980s. Such ‘Rife devices’ have figured prominently in a number of cases of health fraud in the U.S., typically centered around the uselessness of the devices and the grandiose claims with which they are marketed. In a 1996 case, the marketers of a ‘Rife device’ claiming to cure numerous diseases including cancer and AIDS were convicted of felony health fraud.[14] The sentencing judge described them as “target[ing] the most vulnerable people, including those suffering from terminal disease” and providing false hope.[15] In 2002 John Bryon Krueger, who operated the Royal Rife Research Society, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for his role in a murder and also received a concurrent 30-month sentence for illegally selling Rife devices. In 2009 a U.S. court convicted James Folsom of 26 felony counts for sale of the Rife devices sold as ‘NatureTronics’, ‘AstroPulse’, ‘BioSolutions’, ‘Energy Wellness’, and ‘Global Wellness’. [16]

Several deaths have resulted from the use of Rife machines in place of standard medical treatment. In one case, a U.S. court found that the marketer of a Rife device had violated the law and that, as a result of her actions, a cancer patient had ceased chemotherapy and died.[17] In Australia, the use of Rife machines has been blamed for the deaths of cancer patients who might have been cured with conventional therapy.[8]

In 1994, the American Cancer Society reported that Rife machines were being sold in a “pyramid-like, multilevel marketing scheme”. A key component in the marketing of Rife devices has been the claim, initially put forward by Rife himself, that the devices were being suppressed by an establishment conspiracy against cancer “cures”.[5] Although ‘Rife devices’ are not registered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and have been linked to deaths among cancer sufferers, the Seattle Times reported that over 300 people attended the 2006 Rife International Health Conference in Seattle, where dozens of unregistered devices were sold.[9]

Source

Here is the explanation of Rife’s technique to kill canser cells:

 

 

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE, The Sign of Four

Silenced people, scientist Eugene Mallove (murdered)

 

Now I want to post another story how oil dominates the world and everything new energy technologies has to be suppressed.  This is the story of another silenced scientist called Eugene Mallove:

Eugene Franklin Mallove (June 9, 1947 – May 14, 2004) was a scientist, science writer, editor, and publisher of Infinite Energy magazine, and founder of the non-profit organization New Energy Foundation. He was a strong proponent of cold fusion, and a supporter of its research and related exploratory alternative energy topics, several of which are characterised as “fringe science“.

Mallove authored Fire from Ice, a book detailing the 1989 report of table-top cold fusion from Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann at the University of Utah. Among other things, the book advances a conspiracy theory, claiming that the team did produce “greater-than-unity” output energy in an experiment successfully replicated on several occasions, but that the results were suppressed through an organized campaign of ridicule from mainstream physicists, including those studying controlled thermonuclear fusion, trying to protect their research and funding.

Mallove was murdered in 2004 while cleaning out his former childhood home, which had been rented out. Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with the killing. The first trial resulted in a guilty plea to manslaughter in April, 2012.[1]

Biography

Eugene Mallove held a BS (1969) and MS degree (1970) in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from MIT and a ScD degree (1975) in environmental health sciences from Harvard University. He had worked for technology engineering firms such as Hughes Research Laboratories, the Analytic Science Corporation, and MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, and he consulted in research and development of new energies.

In 1981, he and Gregory Matloff wrote a classic paper about using solar sails to reach Alpha Centauri, the nearest star to our sun. They calculated that the trip would take several hundred years and that the ship would have to withstand gravity accelerations of 60 g.[2][3] They wrote several papers on that and other proposed methods of space travel, such as laser propulsion, the Bussard ramjet,[4] and exotic fuels that could give very high power.[5]

Mallove taught science journalism at MIT and Boston University and was chief science writer at MIT’s news office, a position he left as part of a dispute with the school over cold fusion.

He was a science writer and broadcaster with the Voice of America radio service and author of three science books: The Quickening Universe: Cosmic Evolution and Human Destiny (1987, St. Martin’s Press), The Starflight Handbook: A Pioneer’s Guide to Interstellar Travel (1989, John Wiley & Sons, with co-author Gregory Matloff), and Fire from Ice: Searching for the Truth Behind the Cold Fusion Furor (1991, John Wiley & Sons).[6] He also published articles for numerous magazines and newspapers.

Mallove was a member of the Aurora Biophysics Research Institute (ABRI), one of the founders of the International Society of the Friends of Aetherometry, a member of its Organizing Committee, a co-inventor of the HYBORAC[7] technology and one of the main evaluators of ABRI[8] technologies.

His alternative energy research included studying the reproduction of Wilhelm Reich‘s Orgone Motor by Dr. Paulo Correa and Alexandra Correa, as well as the evolution of heat in the Reich-Einstein experiment. He was among the scientists and engineers who claimed to have confirmed the output of excess electric energy from tuned pulsed plasmas in vacuum arc discharges.

Mallove’s combative stance against what he saw as the hypocrisy of mainstream science gave him a high profile. Among other things, he was a frequent guest on the American radio program Coast to Coast AM.

In 1992, Mallove was a consultant on the ERR (Electromagnetic Radiation Receiver) project at the Noah’s Ark Research Facility in the Philippines. He is also credited as a “cold fusion technical consultant”, for providing advice to the producers of the movie The Saint from 1997, with a plot revolving around cold fusion formulas.

Eugene Mallove was a notable proponent and supporter of research into cold fusion. He authored the book Fire from Ice, which details the 1989 report of table-top cold fusion from Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann at the University of Utah.[9] The book claims the team did produce “greater-than-unity” output energy in an experiment, which supposedly was successfully replicated on several occasions.[10] Mallove claims that the results were suppressed through an organized campaign of ridicule from mainstream physicists.

Death

Eugene Mallove was killed on May 14, 2004 in Norwich, Connecticut, while cleaning a recently vacated rental property owned by his parents, the home he grew up in. The nature of Mallove’s work led to some conspiracy theories[11] regarding the homicide, but police suspected robbery as the motive.[12][13]

In 2005, two local men were arrested in connection with the killing.[14][15] The case proceeded slowly and the charges against the two men were finally dismissed on November 6, 2008.[16]

On February 11, 2009, the State of Connecticut announced a $50,000 reward[17] leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the murder. On April 2, 2010, the police made two arrests in connection with the murder and said that more arrests were expected.[18][19] On May 22, 2011, a state prosecutor said that they were charging a third person in connection with the killing. Court testimony indicated that Mallove may have been killed by an evicted tenant who was angry about belongings being disposed of during the clearout.[20]

On April 20, 2012, the Norwich Bulletin stated that: “An ongoing murder trial came to an abrupt halt Friday when Chad Schaffer, of Norwich, decided to accept an offer of 16 years in prison, pleading guilty to the lesser charge of first-degree manslaughter in the 2004 beating death of Eugene Mallove.”[1]

Source

Here is the last interview before Eugene was murdered (3 parts):

 

 

So how many dead people we still need? These technologies will come to light and then, we the people are finally free.

‘Tis strange — but true; for truth is always strange;Stranger than fiction.
LORD BYRON, Don Juan

Silenced people, investigative journalist Gary Webb (murdered)

Gary Webb In His Own Words 623.jpg

Gary Stephen Webb (August 31, 1955 – December 10, 2004) was a Pulitzer prize-winning Americaninvestigative journalist. Webb was best known for his 1996 “Dark Alliance” series of articles written for the San Jose Mercury News and later published as a book. In the three-part series, Webb investigated Nicaraguans linked to the CIA-backed Contras who had allegedly smuggled cocaine into the U.S. Their smuggled cocaine was distributed as crack cocaine in Los Angeles, with the profits funneled back to the Contras. Webb also alleged that this influx of Nicaraguan-supplied cocaine sparked, and significantly fueled, the widespread crack cocaine epidemic that swept through many U.S. cities during the 1980s. According to Webb, the CIA was aware of the cocaine transactions and the large shipments of drugs into the U.S. by Contra personnel. Webb charged that the Reagan administration shielded inner-city drug dealers from prosecution in order to raise money for the Contras, especially after Congress passed the Boland Amendment, which prohibited direct Contra funding.

Webb’s reporting generated fierce controversy, and the San Jose Mercury News backed away from the story, effectively ending Webb’s career as a mainstream media journalist. In 2004, Webb was found dead from two gunshot wounds to the head, which the coroner’s office judged a suicide. Though he was criticized and outcast from the mainstream journalism community, his reportage was eventually vindicated as many of his findings have since been validated: since Webb’s death, both the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune have defended his “Dark Alliance” series. Journalist George Sanchez states that “the CIA’s internal investigation by Inspector General Frederick Hitz vindicated much of Gary’s reporting and observes that despite the campaign against Webb, “the government eventually admitted to more than Gary had initially reported” over the years.[1][better source needed]

Biography

Early life

Webb was born to a military family in Corona, California. At 15, Webb began writing editorials for his suburban Indianapolis high school newspaper. At the height of the protests against the Vietnam War, he created his first controversy when he criticized the use of a female drill team to rally students for the war. Webb attended journalism school at Northern Kentucky University, where he was on staff at the student newspaper The Northerner, but dropped out. He started his professional career at the Kentucky Post, then worked as a statehouse correspondent for The Plain Dealer. Webb found a lifelong passion in investigating government and private sector corruption. In 1988, Webb joined the San Jose Mercury News as a staff writer. He helped expose freeway retrofitting problems in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and wrote stories about computer software problems at the California DMV.[2]

Dark Alliance

Series

In August 1996 the San Jose Mercury News published Webb’s “Dark Alliance,” a 20,000 word, three-part investigative series which alleged that Nicaraguan drug traffickers had sold and distributed crack cocaine in Los Angeles during the 1980s, and that drug profits were used to fund the CIA-supported Nicaraguan Contras. Webb never asserted that the CIA directly aided drug dealers to raise money for the Contras, but he did document that the CIA was aware of the cocaine transactions and the large shipments of cocaine into the U.S. by the Contra personnel.[3] “Dark Alliance” received national attention. At the height of the interest, the web version of it on the San Jose Mercury News website received 1.3 million hits a day. According to the Columbia Journalism Review, the series became “the most talked-about piece of journalism in 1996 and arguably the most famous—some would say infamous—set of articles of the decade.”[4]

Webb supported his story with documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, subsequently including a 450-page declassified version of an October 1988 report by CIA Inspector General Frederick Hitz. According to Webb and his supporters, the evidence demonstrates that White House officials, including Oliver North, knew about and supported using money from drug trafficking to fund the contras, and these officials neglected to pass any information along to the DEA. The 1988 report from the Senate Subcommittee on Narcotics, Terrorism and International Operations of the Committee on Foreign Relations led by Sen. John Kerry commented that there were “serious questions as to whether or not US officials involved in Central America failed to address the drug issue for fear of jeopardizing the war effort against Nicaragua.”[5]

Immediately, denials began to emerge refuting the assertions Webb made in “Dark Alliance.” Reports in the Washington Post (Oct 4, 1996), Los Angeles Times, and New York Times (Oct 21, 1996), tried to debunk the link between the Contras and the crack epidemic. PostombudsmanGeneva Overholser agreed with critics that her paper’s response to Webb’s series showed “misdirected zeal” and “more passion for sniffing out the flaws in San Jose’s answer than for sniffing out a better answer themselves.”[7]Richard Thieme argued in an opinion piece that the major news outlets focused on attacking Webb or less relevant parts of the story, leaving Webb’s thesis largely intact.[8] Overholser concluded there was “strong previous evidence that the CIA at least chose to overlook contra involvement in the drug trade…. Would that we had welcomed the surge of public interest as an occasion to return to a subject the Post and the public had given short shrift. Alas, dismissing someone else’s story as old news comes more naturally.”[9]

Robert Parry, who in 1985 became the first reporter to accuse the Contras of involvement in drug trafficking,[3] wrote that the Post’s denunciation of Webb was ironic, because the paper “had long pooh-poohed earlier allegations that the Contras were implicated in drug shipments” but now “the newspaper was finally accepting the reality of Contra cocaine trafficking, albeit in a backhanded way.”[10]

In response to these attacks, Webb created a web site that contained primary documents, transcripts, and audio interviews. By January 1997, Webb’s editors no longer contacted him about his stories. In March, Webb was informed that the paper was going to address the readers about his series. On May 11, 1997, Mercury News executive editor Jerry Ceppos published an editorial describing the series as an “important work” and “solidly documented,” but criticized the series for: a reliance on one interpretation of complicated, sometimes-conflicting pieces of evidence; failing to estimate the amount of money involved; for oversimplifying the crack epidemic; and for creating impressions that were open to misinterpretation through imprecise language and graphics.[11] Webb was reassigned to a suburban bureau 150 miles from his home. Because of the long commute, Webb quit the paper in December 1997.

Webb alleged that the 1997 backlash was a form of media manipulation. “The government side of the story is coming through the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post,” Webb stated. “They use the giant corporate press rather than saying anything directly. If you work through friendly reporters on major newspapers, it comes off as the New York Times saying it and not a mouthpiece of the CIA.”[11] In 2004, Webb wrote a long piece, “The Mighty Wurlitzer Plays On,” describing the role the Internet played in bringing the “Dark Alliance” story to international attention in 1996, and describing at length the backlash against the story at first externally, through the larger newspapers, and later internally by the paper’s editors:

“How do we know for sure that these drug dealers were the first big ring to start selling crack in South Central?” editor Jonathan Krim pressed me . . . “Isn’t it possible there might have been others before them?”

“There might have been a lot of things, Jon, but we’re only supposed to deal in what we know,” I replied. “The crack dealers I interviewed said they were the first. Cops is South Central said they were the first. and that they controlled the entire market. They wrote it in reports that we have. I haven’t found anything saying otherwise, not one single name, and neither did the New York Times, the Washington Post or the L.A. Times. So what’s the issue here?”

“But how can we say for sure they were the first?” Krim persisted. “Isn’t it possible there might have been someone else and they never got caught and no one ever knew about them? In that case, your story would be wrong.”

I had to take a deep breath to keep from shouting. “If you’re asking me whether I accounted for people who might never have existed, the answer is no,” I said. “I only considered people with names and faces. I didn’t take phantom drug dealers into account.”[12]

James Aucoin, a communications professor who specializes in the history of investigative reporting, wrote: “In the case of Gary Webb’s charges against the CIA and the Contras, the major dailies came after him. Media institutions are now part of the establishment and they have a lot invested in that establishment.”[11]

Book

In 1999, Seven Stories Press published Webb’s Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion, complete with extensive source citations. The book received mixed reviews.

The book includes an account of a meeting between a pilot (who was making drug/arms runs between San Francisco and Costa Rica) with two Contra leaders who were also partners with the San Francisco-based Contra/drug smuggler Norwin Meneses. According to eyewitnesses, Ivan Gomez, identified by one of the Contras as a CIA agent, was allegedly present at the drug transactions. The pilot told Hitz that Gomez said he was there to “ensure that the profits from the cocaine went to the Contras and not into someone’s pocket.”

According to Webb, Judd Iverson, a San Francisco defense attorney who represented former Contra Julio Zavala, discovered compelling evidence demonstrating that “agents of the U.S. government were intricately involved in sanctioning cocaine trafficking to raise funds for Contra revolutionary activity.”[13] Soon after, members of the Justice Department persuaded U.S. District Court Judge Robert Peckham to seal the documents in the case.

Critics

Webb’s reporting on the CIA’s dealings with cocaine dealers was not without its critics. The Nation magazine contributor David Corn, while crediting him that “it is only because of Webb that US citizens have confirmation from the CIA that it partnered up with suspected drug traffickers in the just-say-no years and that the Reagan Administration, consumed with a desire to overthrow the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, allied itself with drug thugs,” also criticized Webb for overstating the case and for not proving “his more cinematic allegations.”[14]

Reason magazine’s Glenn Garvin was critical of Webb’s sources and of the evidence he presented. Garvin wrote that Webb’s evidence that the Contra leadership was selling cocaine is almost entirely drawn from the claims of a few Nicaraguan traffickers facing long jail terms, and argued that they were using the CIA as a convenient scapegoat. Garvin also wrote that every guerilla group, including the Mujahideen, FARC and Shining Path, has used the narcotics trade as a way of bolstering its funding efforts, and that far from the Contra-related drug trade being widespread it came down to a small handful of Contra pilots and their associates who were involved in narcotics. He also argued that while these covert narcotic relationships were alleged to be most rampant, the Contras had the least need for funds, as the United States was supplying them with millions of dollars a year in support.[15]

Supporters and Corroboration

According to historian Mark Fenster,[16]

[T]he common view among journalists and researchers who have reviewed Webb’s stories and have expertise on the Contras and the CIA’s role in Nicaragua is that the stories sometimes overstate and overplay the largely testimonial evidence Webb had gathered but were nevertheless neither false nor fantastic. This is true whether the commentators are sympathetic to or critical of Webb. The historical consensus — to the extent that such a thing is possible concerning controversial covert operations — indicate that the basic outlines of the Mercury News stories were largely correct.

In 2006 the LA Times published The Truth in `Dark Alliance,’ in which L.A. Times Managing Editor Leo Wolinsky is quoted saying “in some ways, Gary got too much blame…He did exactly what you expect from a great investigative reporter.” The article surveys mainstream reporting at the time of Webb’s pieces and states that while Webb had committed “hyperbole” and included some unproven allegations, articles by the New York Times “didn’t include the success he achieved or the wrongs he righted – and they were considerable” according to Walt Bogdanich, now a New York Times editor, who had known Webb earlier.

The LA Times piece criticizes its own unfair portrayal of Webb — “we dropped the ball”—and notes that “spurred on by Webb’s story, the CIA conducted an internal investigation that acknowledged in March 1998 that the agency had covered up Contra drug trafficking for more than a decade” and concludes that “History will tell if Webb receives the credit he’s due for prodding the CIA to acknowledge its shameful collaboration with drug dealers. Meanwhile, the journalistic establishment is only beginning to recognize that the controversy over “Dark Alliance” had more to do with poor editing than bad reporting [on Webb’s part]”.[17]

Writing in 2005 in the Chicago Tribune, about “the Dangers of Questioning Government Actions,” Don Wycliff, the Tribune’s public editor, wrote, “I still think Gary Webb had it mostly right. I think he got the treatment that always comes to those who dare question aloud the bona fides of the establishment: First he got misrepresented — his suggestion that the CIA tolerated the Contras’ cocaine trading became an allegation that the agency itself was involved in the drug trade. Then he was ridiculed as a conspiracy-monger.” [18]

Media Critic Norman Solomon’s analysis, “The Establishment’s Papers Do Damage Control for the CIA,” includes various corroborating evidence that a witch-hunt to discredit Webb was pursued more vigorously than the truth of some of Webb’s allegations, including corroboration internal to one such paper, the Washington Post. Notes Solomon:[19]

The Post’s ombudsman, Geneva Overholser, was on target (11/10/96) when she re-raised the question of the U.S. government’s relationship to drug smuggling and noted that the three newspapers “showed more passion for sniffing out the flaws in San Jose’s answer than for sniffing out a better answer themselves.” Citing “strong previous evidence that the CIA at least chose to overlook contra involvement in the drug trade,” Overholser found “misdirected zeal” in the Post’s response to the Mercury News series: “Would that we had welcomed the surge of public interest as an occasion to return to a subject the Post and the public had given short shrift.”

Investigation timeline

Facing increasing public scrutiny from the fallout after Webb’s “Dark Alliance” series, the CIA conducted its own internal investigations. Investigative journalist Robert Parry credits Webb for being responsible for the following government investigations into the Reagan-Bush administration‘s conduct of the Contra war:

  • On December 10, 1996, Los Angeles CountySheriffSherman Block announced the conclusion of his investigation into the issue, publishing a summary of the investigation at a press conference. He announced at the press conference that “We have found no evidence that the government was involved in drug trafficking in South-Central.” Nevertheless, the report included information that supported some of the charges. Charles Rappleye reported in the L.A. Weekly that Block’s “unequivocal statement is not backed up by the report itself, which raises many questions.”[20] Much of the LAPD investigation centered on allegations made in a postscript article to the newspaper’s “Dark Alliance” series.
  • On January 29, 1998, Hitz published Volume One of his internal investigation. This was the first of two CIA reports that eventually substantiated many of Webb’s claims about cocaine smugglers, the Nicaraguan contra movement, and their ability to freely operate without the threat of law enforcement.[21]
  • On March 16, 1998, Hitz admitted that the CIA had maintained relationships with companies and individuals the CIA knew were involved in the drug business. Hitz told the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that “there are instances where CIA did not, in an expeditious or consistent fashion, cut off relationships with individuals supporting the Contra program who were alleged to have engaged in drug-trafficking activity or take action to resolve the allegations.”[22] Senator John Kerry reached similar conclusions a decade earlier in 1987. (See:[5])
  • On May 7, 1998, Rep. Maxine Waters, revealed a memorandum of understanding – item 24 between the CIA and the Justice Department from 1982, which was entered into the Congressional Record. This letter had freed the CIA from legally reporting drug smuggling by CIA assets, a provision that covered the Nicaraguan Contras and the Afghan rebels.[4]
  • On July 23, 1998, the Justice Department released a report by its Inspector General, Michael R. Bromwich. The Bromwich report claimed that the Reagan-Bush administration was aware of cocaine traffickers in the Contra movement and did nothing to stop the criminal activity. The report also alleged a pattern of discarded leads and witnesses, sabotaged investigations, instances of the CIA working with drug traffickers, and the discouragement of DEA investigations into Contra-cocaine shipments. The CIA’s refusal to share information about Contra drug trafficking with law-enforcement agencies was also documented. The Bromwich report corroborated Webb’s investigation into Norwin Meneses, a Nicaraguan drug smuggler.[23]
  • On October 8, 1998, CIA I.G. Hitz published Volume Two of his internal investigation. The report described how the Reagan-Bush administration had protected more than 50 Contras and other drug traffickers, and by so doing thwarted federal investigations into drug crimes. Hitz published evidence that drug trafficking and money laundering had made its way into Reagan’s National Security Council where Oliver North oversaw the operations of the Contras.[5] According to the report, the Contra war took precedence over law enforcement. To that end, the internal investigation revealed that the CIA routinely withheld evidence of Contra crimes from the Justice Department, Congress and even the analytical division of the CIA itself. Further, the report confirmed Webb’s claims regarding the origins and the relationship of Contra fundraising and drug trafficking. The report also included information about CIA ties to other drug traffickers not discussed in the Webb series, including Moises Nunez and Ivan Gomez. More importantly, the internal CIA report documented a cover-up of evidence which had led to false intelligence assessments.

Aftermath and death

After leaving San Jose Mercury News Webb went to work for the California Assembly Speaker’s Office of Member Services and served as a consultant to the California State legislature Task Force on Government Oversight. As a member of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee, Webb investigated charges that the Oracle Corporation received a no-bid contract award of $95 million in 2001 from former California Governor Gray Davis. Webb was hired by the Sacramento News and Review, after being laid off in 2003 with the rest of the former Speaker’s staff as part of a house-cleaning when the new Speaker took over.[24]

On December 10, 2004, Gary Webb was found dead from two gunshot wounds to the head.[25] Sacramento County coroner Robert Lyons ruled that it was suicide, noting that a suicide note was found at the scene.[25] Webb’s ex-wife, Sue Webb-now Sue Stokes- said that Webb had been depressed for years over his inability to get a job at daily newspaper: Webb continued to write, but financially could not support his family.[25]

Each of his children received individualized notes, which Gary mailed to his brother, Kurt Webb, in San Jose on December 9, 2004. He had also had his motorcycle stolen (it was recovered from the thief, a Sacramento local who specialized in grand theft, by his family after his death) and lost his home (due to housing-market crash and his inability to get hired at a ‘daily’ newspaper) the week prior to his suicide. He also took each of his three children out for ‘Dinner & a Movie,’ in that time frame. This was unlike him. Although unaware of this until after his passing, this was his way of saying “Good-Bye.” Many people believe Gary Webb was murdered to keep him from exposing governmental corruption. [26][27]

In April 2011, a second book-length collection of his articles that span his entire career ouitside of the Dark Alliance series, entitled The Killing Game: Selected Stories from the Author of Dark Alliance, by Gary Webb and his youngest son, Eric Webb, was released by Seven Stories Press.[28]

Posthumous Recognition

In 2013, it was announced that a movie based on the Dark Alliance series called ‘’Kill the Messenger’’, to be directed by Michael Cuesta and starring Jeremy Renner as Webb, would be produced.[29] The news prompted Scott Herhold, Webb’s first editor at the Mercury-News, to write, “Gary Webb was a journalist of outsized talent. Few reporters I’ve known could match his nose for an investigative story. When he was engaged, he worked hard. He wrote well. But Webb had one huge blind side: He was fundamentally a man of passion, not of fairness. When facts didn’t fit his theory, he tended to shove them to the sidelines.” Herhold concluded, “He was no villain . . . He was no hero either. Take it from someone who knew him well.” [30]

Source

 

 

Gary’s mother tells about his death:

 

So how many it takes before the Truth comes out? Don’t worry the Truth shall prevail…

“Truth never lost ground by enquiry.”
WILLIAM PENN, Some Fruits of Solitude